Lighting

Wall Sconces

Our entire team here at CLOTH & KIND is totally gaga over Visual Comfort's ridiculously good lighting line, and we source from them all the time for our interior design Studio projects. It's hard to play favorites, but here's a handful of sconces that we are digging at the moment...

CLOTH & KIND // Fab Five, Wall Sconces

1. Ryan Miller, Showroom Director
Frankfort Articulating Wall Light in Black and Hand-Rubbed Antique Brass Accents

2. Krista Nye Nicholas, Partner & Principal Interior Designer
Avant Large Curved Sconce in Antique-Burnished Brass with Frosted Glass

3. Tami Ramsay, Partner & Principal Interior Designer
Cavanagh Medium Lantern Sconce in Polished Nickel

4. Rachael Bell, Senior Interior Designer
Launceton Large Ring Sconce in Antique- Burnished Brass with Natural Percale Shade

5. Alyson Derry, Interior Design Director
Osiris Single Reflector Sconce in Bronze and Hand-Rubbed Antique Brass with Linen Diffuser

If you're in the interior design trade, you are undoubtedly in love with Visual Comfort as well. If you're not a designer and simply a design afficianado, you may still be familiar with the line through Circa Lighting (the retail arm of the company). In either case, what you gotta know is that CLOTH & KIND is now an official Visual Comfort Gallery partner! That means you can check out a full range of their gorgeous fixtures in person here and order them (at more advantageous pricing than Circa offers - both to the trade and at retail, BTW!) through either our Showroom or Shop

Atlanta Homes & Lifestyles // Home for the Holidays

ABOUT THE SHOWHOUSE // Several months ago, we received the distinct honor of being invited to design a space in the prestigious Atlanta Homes & Lifestyles' Home for the Holidays showhouse. The annual showhouse is a one-of-a-kind holiday experience and in 2014 it featured a newly constructed English-style home in Atlanta’s upscale Buckhead neighborhood. The 7,200-square-foot home built by Sheehan Built Homes was inspired by the arts and crafts style developed by Sir Edwin Lutyens of England in the late 1800s and early 1900s. A stone and brick façade carries the steep roof with large windows and cut stone quoins and headers, reminiscent of Lutyens designs, throughout. The interior boasts four bedrooms and four bathrooms along with a study and sitting room. Perched atop a hill, the home’s large-scale backyard is a focal point featuring a heavily canopied landscape.  The luxury home showcases the work of acclaimed local and national designers (eeeek... that includes us!!) who were selected to put their touches on each room to create a true designer showhouse. The home was open to the public for tours in November and early December 2014 and proceeds from the event benefitted the Southeastern Horticultural Society’s Learning Gardens and Farms

ABOUT CLOTH & KIND'S SPACES //  Given the tucked away location of the vestibule and bonus room, on the second floor - above the three car garage, we were inspired to turn the adjoining spaces into an alluring destination in the home - a seductive and modern day speakeasy.  A cheeky nod to the blind tiger, as speakeasies were often referred to during the prohibition era, we swathed the walls of the vestibule in ZAK+FOX’s luxurious Khaden tiger print fabric.  Dark and sultry trim, ceilings and walls in Sydney Harbour Paint’s Jaguar sets the mood and creates the ideal backdrop upon which a myriad of geometric shapes are echoed throughout the bonus room in watery shades of cream, blue & indigo, plum, blush pink and neutral. Just as speakeasies did in their day, the bonus room beckons with promises of lounging and frivolity - cocktails, cards, dancing and an abundance of comfortable seating in an inviting salon.  Paired with a mid-century bar, and a trio of old rail car barstools found on the side of the road, saddling up to the bar has never been so stylish. True to CLOTH & KIND’s vibe, the two spaces are layered with history and heart, with story and substance. The ultimate mix of vintage, modern, textures, art, colors and of course, layers upon layers of unique textiles create the ultimate destination in this stately Habersham home. And, PS, we just had a blast designing these spaces! You can find full coverage of the house, including our spaces, in the February 2015 issue of Atlanta Homes & Lifestyles magazine. Please also enjoy these photos, taken by our dear photographer Sarah Dorio, for our Portfolio.

THE VESTIBULE //

AHL Home for the Holidays Showhouse // CLOTH & KIND
AHL Home for the Holidays Showhouse // CLOTH & KIND
AHL Home for the Holidays Showhouse // CLOTH & KIND
AHL Home for the Holidays Showhouse // CLOTH & KIND

THE BONUS ROOM //

AHL Home for the Holidays Showhouse // CLOTH & KIND
AHL Home for the Holidays Showhouse // CLOTH & KIND
AHL Home for the Holidays Showhouse // CLOTH & KIND
AHL Home for the Holidays Showhouse // CLOTH & KIND
AHL Home for the Holidays Showhouse // CLOTH & KIND
AHL Home for the Holidays Showhouse // CLOTH & KIND
AHL Home for the Holidays Showhouse // CLOTH & KIND
AHL Home for the Holidays Showhouse // CLOTH & KIND
AHL Home for the Holidays Showhouse // CLOTH & KIND
AHL Home for the Holidays Showhouse // CLOTH & KIND
AHL Home for the Holidays Showhouse // CLOTH & KIND


Lee Kleinhelter

Proust on Design: Lee Kleinhelter | CLOTH & KIND

what is your idea of perfect design happiness?

WHEN THE CONCEPT IS APPRECIATED & UNDERSTOOD.

what is your greatest fear in design?

BEING UNORIGINAL.

which historical design figure do you most identify with?

BILLY BALDWIN. LOVE THAT ERA OF DESIGN.

which living designer do you most admire?

THERE ARE LOTS. KELLY WEARSTLER, MILES REDD ARE A FEW.

Proust on Design: Lee Kleinhelter | CLOTH & KIND

what profession other than design would you like to attempt?

PHOTOGRAPHY.

what is your greatest design extravagance?

THE LUXURY OF BEING ABLE TO RECREATE, FORM A COMPLETELY NEW LOOK IN THE STORE OR A PIECE OF FURNITURE. THAT’S WHAT I LOVE TO DO, CONSTANTLY EDITING, RETHINKING AND RESTYLING.

when and where were you happiest with your design?

I’M HAPPIEST WHEN THE STORE OR A PROJECT IS COMPLETELY FINISHED AND EVERYTHING IS IN THE PERFECT SPOT, THEN THE STORY COMES TOGETHER.

Proust on Design: Lee Kleinhelter | CLOTH & KIND

what do you consider your greatest achievement in design?

INSPIRING PEOPLE. WHEN PEOPLE COME INTO A SPACE WE’VE DESIGNED OR INTO PIECES, AND THEY SAY THEY’VE NEVER SEEN ANYTHING LIKE IT THAT MAKES DESIGN SCHOOL, WORKING FOR DESIGNERS AND THE LAST 9 YEARS OF HAVING A BRICK & MORTAR… WORTH IT.

if you died and came back as another designer or design object, who or what do you think it would be?

HOW TO PICK? MY NON-DESIGN ANSWER WOULD BE RIDER. ENGLISH CREAM GOLDEN RETRIEVER THAT EMBARRASSINGLY ENOUGH GETS MORE ATTENTION THAN ANYTHING WE SELL.

Proust on Design: Lee Kleinhelter | CLOTH & KIND

what specific design related talent are you lacking that you would like most to have?
THE KNOWLEDGE OF AN ARCHITECT OR AN ENGINEER. MY HUSBAND IS A BUILDER AND WHEN WE MEET WITH ARCHITECTS IT’S FASCINATING HOW THEY KNOW HOW TO CREATE WHAT’S BEEN DESIGNED.

what is your most treasured design related possession?
THE WHITE LEATHER EAMES LOUNGE CHAIR & OTTOMAN IN OUR BEDROOM. IT’S SUBTLE, NOTHING FLASHY. I LOVE THE STYLE, THE HISTORY, AND COMBINING THE CRISP WHITE MATERIAL WITH ITS ORIGINAL WOOD FRAME. IT ALSO SITS IN A POSITION YOU CAN SEE FROM ALL ANGLES IN OUR HOME.

Proust on Design: Lee Kleinhelter | CLOTH & KIND

what do you regard as the lowest depths of misery in design?
A SPACE OR ROOM WHERE EVERYTHING IS THE SAME, HAS BEEN BOUGHT AS A MATCHING SET, WITH NO DEPTH, LAYERS OR TEXTURES.

what curse word do you most frequently use?
NOW THAT MY 3 YEAR OLD PICKS UP ON EVERY SINGLE WORD WE SAY I’VE TRIED TO TONE DOWN THE CURSING, THOUGH NOT ALWAYS SUCCESSFULLY. HE RECENTLY POINTED OUT TO ME THAT STUPID IS NOT NICE, HE’S RIGHT. I THINK I WAS SAYING SOMETHING ALONG THE LINES OF ‘THAT’S SO STUPID’ ABOUT A THING I HAD DONE. I DEFINITELY SAY A LOT OF ‘WHAT THE HELL…?’ & ‘OH MY GOD’.

Proust on Design: Lee Kleinhelter | CLOTH & KIND

what is your favorite design related word?
WELL EDITED.

what is your least favorite design related word?
TRENDY.

what turns you on in design?
ORDER, THE UNEXPECTED, THINKING OUTSIDE OF THE BOX.

what turns you off in design?
ANYTHING BLATANTLY COPYING SOMEONE ELSE’S DESIGN.

what is your motto in design?
BE UNIQUE.

Proust on Design: Lee Kleinhelter | CLOTH & KIND

ABOUT PROUST ON DESIGN | Answered by our design icons, these must-ask questions come from a 19th century parlor game made popular by Marcel Proust, the French novelist, essayist & critic. Proust believed the direct questions and honest responses that they elicited revealed the true nature of the individual. For this column, we have put a design related spin on the traditional questions. While this method has been used by many journalists throughout the years, we were primarily inspired by The Proust Questionnaire, which appears monthly on the back page of one of our all time favorite magazines, Vanity Fair (also Krista’s alma mater). Read all of the previous Proust on Design questionnaires here.