Interview

Pantone Vignette Featuring Caroline Cecil Textiles

CLOTH & KIND // Pantone Vignette Featuring Caroline Cecil Textiles

What an honor it was to be selected by Pantone as one of a handful of design firms from across the country to create a vignette for their Design Exhibition at Atlanta's AmericasMart, each inspired by one of Pantoneview's Home + Interiors 2016 color palettes. Turns out, the entire process was just darn fun, to boot.

CLOTH & KIND // Pantone Vignette Featuring Caroline Cecil Textiles

We selected Pantone's Soft Focus palette, which spoke to us both at our core, and almost instantly conjured up images in our minds of a beautifully chaotic artist or collector's studio. Soft Focus is a stellar collection of hues that represent a place between pastels and mid-tones. Subtle and/or muted, sometimes described as 'smoky' and pleasingly versatile, they are often married to a variety of other like shades. Whether in striated, layered or veiled patterning where, when used in combinations, one color blends effortlessly into another.

CLOTH & KIND // Pantone Vignette Featuring Caroline Cecil Textiles

We've been fans of Caroline Cecil Textiles ever since we were first introduced to Caroline at the Bradley showroom in Atlanta during Design ADAC week. When we got a sneak peek of her new designs and asked if she'd be interested in including a couple of them (TITIK & HUTAN) in our Pantone vignette and she enthusiastically said yes, we knew the design was taking shape just as we wanted. We couldn't wait to use TITIK all over the walls, in true CLOTH & KIND fashion, as a textural backdrop to for the art, and HUTAN seemed as if it was made for Palecek's Strings Attached chair, no?

CLOTH & KIND // Pantone Vignette Featuring Caroline Cecil Textiles

The AmericasMart showrooms and vendors were all wonderful about allowing us to pull from their inventory to create the space we imagined. Special thanks to Currey & Company for the chandelier, Eliko for the gorgeous vintage kilim rugs, Palecek for that spectacular chair, Go Home for the hide chair and desk, and Golden Oldies for so many of the interesting pieces that made the space look truly layered and patinaed - just the way we like em! Also, a huge shout out to Zoe Bios Creative whose artwork we incorporated. We would have used more had we had the wall space! Much of the art also comes from our CLOTH & KIND vintage collection. 

CLOTH & KIND // Pantone Vignette Featuring Caroline Cecil Textiles
CLOTH & KIND // Pantone Vignette Featuring Caroline Cecil Textiles

Caroline interviewed us for her blog (which is fabulous, by the way - check it out!) and gives nice insight into our creative process so we wanted to share it with you all here as well.

CCT // Can you ladies share a bit about the conception of your theme and your design process.

CLOTH & KIND // The nice thing about being invited to design vignettes like this one is that it gives us the opportunity for complete and total creative freedom, unlike when we are designing with and for a client and it’s our job to create a space that perfectly suits their personal tastes. We always have a blast letting our minds wander and coming up with ideas that are personally moving to the two of us. For this particular Pantone space, we selected the ‘Soft Focus’ color palette because we were endlessly inspired by the relaxed and creative hues like Tourmaline (Pantone 16-4411), Smoke Green (Pantone 15-6315), Blossom (Pantone 14-1513), Nostalgia Rose (Pantone 17-1512), Cream Gold (Pantone 13-0739) and Peach Nougat (Pantone 14-1220). With such a range of tones, we almost immediately envisioned a colorful artist’s studio with walls covered in vibrant paintings. As with all creative endeavors, when we hit the right concept or idea, both of us are just like ‘YES, this is it!’ and the rest happens organically and very naturally.

CTT // How did you source key materials, including textiles from CCT’s new line?

CLOTH & KIND // In true CLOTH & KIND form, we wanted to swath the walls with a textile to be a stunning and textural backdrop to all of the paintings we envisioned. We had met Caroline Cecil recently at ADAC and admired her work so we inquired if she’d be interested in working with us. When she enthusiastically replied that she was AND she had some new, never been seen before designs that we could use, it was another moment in our creative process where we felt everything coming together just as it should be. We fell in love with her new TITIK and HUTAN patterns and the rest was history. Since HUTAN has a bit of a tropical vibe to it, we played that up further with the Currey & Co light fixture and the Palecek woven chair we selected. Eliko is hands down our favorite source for vintage and antique rugs and we found the colorful Kilims through them. AmericasMart vendors were all so gracious about allowing us to pull from their inventory and use pieces that fit with our project. We’re pretty darn happy with how it all turned out.

CCT // Where did you source the artwork?

CLOTH & KIND // Zoe Bios has an incredible array of gorgeous artwork so we got a couple of large pieces from there, but the rest is vintage from our CLOTH & KIND Atelier collection. We always have to include vintage in projects. It adds a layer of patina that is so key to any space for us.

CCT // Where did you source the chair and what was the process like reinventing it and reupholstering it?

CLOTH & KIND // Isn’t it fabulous? It’s called the Strings Attached chair (which we got a giggle over). Our friends at Palecek are always so incredibly supportive in allowing us to use their inventory for special projects like this one. They were even cool with us reupholstering the cushions in CCT’s Hutan, which felt like it was MADE for this chair.

CCT // Well, it's clear that all the hard work paid off. The vignette was a total stunner, and according to many, the talk of the show. Hey, even Rue Magazine selected it as their favorite vignette! Click here to read their thoughts. If you're interested in HUTAN and TITIK, the two new CCT prints that CLOTH & KIND used in their vignette, stay tuned. We will be unveiling a pre-launch online next week, followed up to the full launch in our showrooms on February 16th. 


Be sure to check out the other gorgeous vignettes created by the talented interior designers that participated in the Pantone Design Exhibition including Janie Hirsch, Heather Hogan Roberts, Shaun Smith, Michael Habachy, Robert Leleux, Jamie Durie, Michel Boyd & Kristin Alber.

Thank you again to all of our creative partners and showrooms. You are the best!

PS // Here's a couple of shots from the Pantone soiree at AmericasMart. As you can see, we didn't have any fun at all! 

CLOTH & KIND // Pantone Vignette Featuring Caroline Cecil Textiles
CLOTH & KIND // Pantone Vignette Featuring Caroline Cecil Textiles

PHOTO CREDITS // All images taken by CLOTH & KIND

Jeffrey Allan Marks

what is your idea of perfect design happiness? COMFORT, FIRST AND FOREMOST.

what is your greatest fear in design? TOO MANY ‘STATEMENT’ ITEMS IN ONE ROOM. THERE CAN’T BE TOO MANY ‘STARS’ IN THE SAME SPACE.

which historical design figure do you most identify with? MARK HAMPTON AND FRANCES ELKINS.

which living designer do you most admire? ALBERT HADLEY AND JOHN STEFANIDIS.

what profession other than design would you like to attempt? BOY BAND SINGER.

what is your greatest design extravagance? CASHMERE FROM BRUNELLO CUCINELLI.

when and where are you happiest with your design? EARLY MORNING, WHEN A SPACE IS CALM.

what do you consider your greatest achievement in design? MY RESTAURANT SPACES.

if you died and came back as another designer or design object, who or what do you think it would be? DAVID HICKS.

what specific design related talent are you lacking that you would you most like to have? DRAWING.

what is your most treasured design related possession? MY ART.

what do you regard as the lowest depths of misery in design? BAD ‘EXISTING’ CLIENT RUGS.

what curse word do you most frequently use? I DON’T REALLY CURSE.

what is your favorite design related word? TAILORED.

what is your least favorite design related word? BUDGET.

what turns you on in design? CLIENTS WHO ARE CREATIVE AND OPEN MINDED.

what turns you off in design? CLIENTS WHO ARGUE.

what is your motto in design? MAKE IT MEAN SOMETHING!

 

IMAGE CREDITS | Images provided by Jeffrey Allan Marks.

ABOUT PROUST ON DESIGN | Answered by our design icons, these must-ask questions come from a 19th century parlor game made popular by Marcel Proust, the French novelist, essayist & critic. Proust believed the direct questions and honest responses that they elicited revealed the true nature of the individual. For this column, we have put a design related spin on the traditional questions. While this method has been used by many journalists throughout the years, we were primarily inspired by The Proust Questionnaire, which appears monthly on the back page of one of our all time favorite magazines, Vanity Fair (also Krista’s alma mater). Read all of the previous Proust on Design questionnaires here.

Lonny, October 2013

If I were half as eloquent of a writer as my beloved partner in crime, Tami Ramsay, I may be able to adequately articulate the tremendous sense of joy and pride I'm feeling over her wonderfully storied home being featured in this month's Lonny magazine.

But, alas, I have never been exceptionally good with the written word so I will allow these incredible photos of her home - so beautifully shot by Sarah Dorio, and the gracefully written piece by Kate Abney - speak on my behalf.

We both want to give everyone at Lonny, especially Sarah, Kate and Catherine Dash - the brainchild of this story - big old virtual smooches and hugs. Thank you, most sincerely. Now go check out the full story, y'all  (there's lots more photos to be seen) - and be sure to leave a comment to let us know what you think!

Tami Ramsay, you rock.

 

Lee Kleinhelter

Proust on Design: Lee Kleinhelter | CLOTH & KIND

what is your idea of perfect design happiness?

WHEN THE CONCEPT IS APPRECIATED & UNDERSTOOD.

what is your greatest fear in design?

BEING UNORIGINAL.

which historical design figure do you most identify with?

BILLY BALDWIN. LOVE THAT ERA OF DESIGN.

which living designer do you most admire?

THERE ARE LOTS. KELLY WEARSTLER, MILES REDD ARE A FEW.

Proust on Design: Lee Kleinhelter | CLOTH & KIND

what profession other than design would you like to attempt?

PHOTOGRAPHY.

what is your greatest design extravagance?

THE LUXURY OF BEING ABLE TO RECREATE, FORM A COMPLETELY NEW LOOK IN THE STORE OR A PIECE OF FURNITURE. THAT’S WHAT I LOVE TO DO, CONSTANTLY EDITING, RETHINKING AND RESTYLING.

when and where were you happiest with your design?

I’M HAPPIEST WHEN THE STORE OR A PROJECT IS COMPLETELY FINISHED AND EVERYTHING IS IN THE PERFECT SPOT, THEN THE STORY COMES TOGETHER.

Proust on Design: Lee Kleinhelter | CLOTH & KIND

what do you consider your greatest achievement in design?

INSPIRING PEOPLE. WHEN PEOPLE COME INTO A SPACE WE’VE DESIGNED OR INTO PIECES, AND THEY SAY THEY’VE NEVER SEEN ANYTHING LIKE IT THAT MAKES DESIGN SCHOOL, WORKING FOR DESIGNERS AND THE LAST 9 YEARS OF HAVING A BRICK & MORTAR… WORTH IT.

if you died and came back as another designer or design object, who or what do you think it would be?

HOW TO PICK? MY NON-DESIGN ANSWER WOULD BE RIDER. ENGLISH CREAM GOLDEN RETRIEVER THAT EMBARRASSINGLY ENOUGH GETS MORE ATTENTION THAN ANYTHING WE SELL.

Proust on Design: Lee Kleinhelter | CLOTH & KIND

what specific design related talent are you lacking that you would like most to have?
THE KNOWLEDGE OF AN ARCHITECT OR AN ENGINEER. MY HUSBAND IS A BUILDER AND WHEN WE MEET WITH ARCHITECTS IT’S FASCINATING HOW THEY KNOW HOW TO CREATE WHAT’S BEEN DESIGNED.

what is your most treasured design related possession?
THE WHITE LEATHER EAMES LOUNGE CHAIR & OTTOMAN IN OUR BEDROOM. IT’S SUBTLE, NOTHING FLASHY. I LOVE THE STYLE, THE HISTORY, AND COMBINING THE CRISP WHITE MATERIAL WITH ITS ORIGINAL WOOD FRAME. IT ALSO SITS IN A POSITION YOU CAN SEE FROM ALL ANGLES IN OUR HOME.

Proust on Design: Lee Kleinhelter | CLOTH & KIND

what do you regard as the lowest depths of misery in design?
A SPACE OR ROOM WHERE EVERYTHING IS THE SAME, HAS BEEN BOUGHT AS A MATCHING SET, WITH NO DEPTH, LAYERS OR TEXTURES.

what curse word do you most frequently use?
NOW THAT MY 3 YEAR OLD PICKS UP ON EVERY SINGLE WORD WE SAY I’VE TRIED TO TONE DOWN THE CURSING, THOUGH NOT ALWAYS SUCCESSFULLY. HE RECENTLY POINTED OUT TO ME THAT STUPID IS NOT NICE, HE’S RIGHT. I THINK I WAS SAYING SOMETHING ALONG THE LINES OF ‘THAT’S SO STUPID’ ABOUT A THING I HAD DONE. I DEFINITELY SAY A LOT OF ‘WHAT THE HELL…?’ & ‘OH MY GOD’.

Proust on Design: Lee Kleinhelter | CLOTH & KIND

what is your favorite design related word?
WELL EDITED.

what is your least favorite design related word?
TRENDY.

what turns you on in design?
ORDER, THE UNEXPECTED, THINKING OUTSIDE OF THE BOX.

what turns you off in design?
ANYTHING BLATANTLY COPYING SOMEONE ELSE’S DESIGN.

what is your motto in design?
BE UNIQUE.

Proust on Design: Lee Kleinhelter | CLOTH & KIND

ABOUT PROUST ON DESIGN | Answered by our design icons, these must-ask questions come from a 19th century parlor game made popular by Marcel Proust, the French novelist, essayist & critic. Proust believed the direct questions and honest responses that they elicited revealed the true nature of the individual. For this column, we have put a design related spin on the traditional questions. While this method has been used by many journalists throughout the years, we were primarily inspired by The Proust Questionnaire, which appears monthly on the back page of one of our all time favorite magazines, Vanity Fair (also Krista’s alma mater). Read all of the previous Proust on Design questionnaires here.

Angie Hranowsky

Proust on Design: Angie Hranowsky | CLOTH & KIND

what is your idea of perfect design happiness? WHEN I’M IN THE MOMENT AND MY MIND IS RACING WITH IDEAS.

what is your greatest fear in design? I TRY NOT TO GET CAUGHT UP IN FEAR. I CHOOSE TO TRUST IN MY ABILITY AND KEEP MY MIND AND HEART OPEN.

which historical design figure do you most identify with? GIO PONTI.

Proust on Design: Angie Hranowsky | CLOTH & KIND

which living designer do you most admire? MURIEL BRANDOLINI. SHE’S BRILLIANT.

what profession other than design would you like to attempt? ARCHITECT.

what is your greatest design extravagance? DESIGNING FOR MYSELF.

Proust on Design: Angie Hranowsky | CLOTH & KIND

when and where were you happiest with your design? ANYTIME I HAVE A JOB AND A CLIENT THAT CHALLENGES AND INSPIRES ME AND ALLOWS ME THE OPPORTUNITY TO THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX.

what do you consider your greatest achievement in design? CHOOSING TO FOLLOW MY HEART AND MAKE THE TRANSITION FROM GRAPHIC DESIGN TO PURSUE INTERIOR DESIGN... AND CONTINUING TO BUILD ON MY SUCCESS OF THAT DREAM.

if you died and came back as another designer or design object, who or what do you think it would be? A CONSTANTIN BRANCUSI SCULPTURE.

Proust on Design: Angie Hranowsky | CLOTH & KIND

what specific design related talent are you lacking that you would you most like to have? THE ABILITY TO DRAW ARCHITECTURAL PLANS.

what is your most treasured design related possession? MY COLLECTION OF ARTWORK AND POTTERY.

what do you regard as the lowest depths of misery in design? THE LACK OF INSPIRATION IN DESIGNING FOR THE MASSES.

what curse word do you most frequently use? FUCK.

what is your favorite design related word? MODERNISM.

what is your least favorite design related word? GLAMOUR.

what turns you on in design? NONCONFORMITY.

what turns you off in design? UNORIGINALITY.

what is your motto in design? BE AUTHENTIC.

Proust on Design: Angie Hranowsky | CLOTH & KIND

//

ABOUT PROUST ON DESIGN | Answered by our design icons, these must-ask questions come from a 19th century parlor game made popular by Marcel Proust, the French novelist, essayist & critic. Proust believed the direct questions and honest responses that they elicited revealed the true nature of the individual. For this column, we have put a design related spin on the traditional questions. While this method has been used by many journalists throughout the years, we were primarily inspired by The Proust Questionnaire, which appears monthly on the back page of one of our all time favorite magazines, Vanity Fair (also Krista’s alma mater). Read all of the previous Proust on Design questionnaires here.

Laura Kirar

Proust on Design: Laura Kirar | CLOTH & KIND

what is your idea of perfect design happiness? BEING SURROUNDED BY NATURE, ENVIRONMENTS AND OBJECTS THAT INSPIRE WONDER.

what is your greatest fear in design? FEAR ITSELF.

which historical design figure do you most identify with? EILEEN GRAY.

which living designer do you most admire? MAYA ROMANOFF FOR HIS TALENT, INNOVATIONS AND PERSEVERANCE.

Proust on DesLaura Kirar | CLOTH & KIND

what profession other than design would you like to attempt? PRODUCER.

what is your greatest design extravagance? RESTORING MY HACIENDA IN THE YUCATAN.

when and where were you happiest with your design? WHEREVER I AM IN THE DESIGN PROCESS - BEING IN THE PRESENT.

what do you consider your greatest achievement in design? THAT I EVOLVE AS AN ARTIST AND CONTINUE TO PRODUCE NEW RELEVANT WORK.

if you died and came back as another designer or design object, who or what do you think it would be? MICHELANGELO.

what specific design related talent are you lacking that you would you most like to have? BETTER TIME MANAGEMENT.

what is your most treasured design related possession? MY SAPPHO CUFF BY LORAE RUSSO. IT'S THE PERFECT COMBINATION OF NATURE, STRENGTH AND SENSUALITY.

Proust on Design: Laura Kirar | CLOTH & KIND

what do you regard as the lowest depths of misery in design? DISPOSABLE DESIGN. INJECTION MOULDED PLASTICS AND OTHER “LANDFILL WAITING TO HAPPEN”.

what curse word do you most frequently use? FUCKING HELL.

what is your favorite design related word? ELEGANT.

what is your least favorite design related word? ECLECTIC – REALLY WHAT DOES THAT MEAN?

what turns you on in design? LONGEVITY.

what turns you off in design? TRENDINESS.

what is your motto in design? BETTER TO CREATE ONE INCREDIBLE THING IN 10 DAYS THAN 10 MEDIOCRE THINGS IN ONE.

//

IMAGE CREDITS | Laura Kirar photographed by Soohang LeeMaya Romanoff, Lorae Russo.

ABOUT PROUST ON DESIGN | Answered by our design icons, these must-ask questions come from a 19th century parlor game made popular by Marcel Proust, the French novelist, essayist & critic. Proust believed the direct questions and honest responses that they elicited revealed the true nature of the individual. For this column, we have put a design related spin on the traditional questions. While this method has been used by many journalists throughout the years, we were primarily inspired by The Proust Questionnaire, which appears monthly on the back page of one of our all time favorite magazines, Vanity Fair (also Krista’s alma mater). Read all of the previous Proust on Design questionnaires here.

Babi Ahluwalia

Proust on Design: Babi Ahluwalia | CLOTH & KIND

what is your idea of perfect design happiness? TO ENVISION AN IDEA OR SOMETHING IN MY MIND AND THEN BE ABLE TO FIND THE RESOURCES TO EXECUTE IT. PERFECTION WOULD BE FINALLY SEEING THAT THE APPLICATION OF MY IDEA HAS EXCEEDED MY INITIAL VISION FROM ITS CONCEPTION.

what is your greatest fear in design? I HAVE NO FEAR IN DESIGN.

which historical design figure do you most identify with? MAHARAJA OF PATIALA. THE REGALITY OF HIS AURA, AND IN ESSENCE, ALL THE ROYALS FROM INDIA, IS AWE INSPIRING.

which living designer do you most admire? OSCAR DE LA RENTA BECAUSE OF HIS TIMELESS STYLES AND SUCCESSFUL LONGEVITY.

Proust on Design: Babi Ahluwalia | CLOTH & KIND

what profession other than design would you like to attempt? SOMETHING IN THE CREATIVE FIELD SUCH AS ADVERTISING OR CALLIGRAPHY.

what is your greatest design extravagance? MY PROCLIVITY TO TRAVEL AROUND THE GLOBE FOR INSPIRATION.

when and where were you happiest with your design? IT’S HARD TO PICK ONE MOMENT. AS LONG AS I AM DOING WHAT I LOVE MORNING, NOON, AND NIGHT, I WILL ALWAYS BE HAPPY.

Proust on Design: Babi Ahluwalia | CLOTH & KIND

what do you consider your greatest achievement in design? MY TWO STORES IN NEW YORK. ANKASA MADISON AND ANKASA SOHO.

if you died and came back as another designer or design object, who or what do you think it would be? A TOOL USED TO EXPRESS SOMEONE’S CREATIVITY - AN EASEL, OR BRUSH OR PENCIL.

what specific design related talent are you lacking that you would you most like to have? A DEEPER UNDERSTANDING OF THE FORM OF DESIGN WOULD HELP SHAPE MY OVERALL UNDERSTANDING OF WHAT IT MEANS TO BE A DESIGNER.

what is your most treasured design related possession? MY MOST TREASURED POSSESSIONS AREN’T TANGIBLE OBJECTS BUT RATHER TRAITS THAT I HOLD DEAR SUCH AS MY KEEN EYE AND MY ABILITY TO VISUALIZE THINGS.

Proust on Design: Babi Ahluwalia | CLOTH & KIND

what do you regard as the lowest depths of misery in design? KNOCK-OFFS.

what curse word do you most frequently use? BLEEP! BLEEP! BLEEP! (I KNOW HOW TO USE THE F--- WORD).

what is your favorite design related word? ANKASA IT! (USED AS A VERB).

Proust on Design: Babi Ahluwalia | CLOTH & KIND

what is your least favorite design related word? PRICING!

what turns you on in design? ALL THE MYSTERY THAT IS INVOLVED IN CREATING AND THE INFINITE POSSIBILITIES THAT LAY AHEAD.

what turns you off in design? NOTHING REALLY!

what is your motto in design? WHEN I’M WORKING WITH MY TEAM MY FAVORITE SAYING IS “KEEP IT RELEVANT".

//

IMAGE CREDITS | via Ankasa and Sachin + Babi. Oscar de la Renta photo via Zaid Hamid.

ABOUT PROUST ON DESIGN | Answered by our design icons, these must-ask questions come from a 19th century parlor game made popular by Marcel Proust, the French novelist, essayist & critic. Proust believed the direct questions and honest responses that they elicited revealed the true nature of the individual. For this column, we have put a design related spin on the traditional questions. While this method has been used by many journalists throughout the years, we were primarily inspired by The Proust Questionnaire, which appears monthly on the back page of one of our all time favorite magazines, Vanity Fair (also Krista’s alma mater). Read all of the previous Proust on Design questionnaires here.

Timothy Corrigan

Proust on Design: Timothy Corrigan | CLOTH & KIND

what is your idea of perfect design happiness? A WELL-PROPORTIONED ROOM WITH PLENTY OF NATURAL LIGHT AND A CLIENT WITH A GOOD BUDGET WHO SAYS: “AMAZE ME!”

Proust on Design: Timothy Corrigan | CLOTH & KIND

what is your greatest fear in design? PLASTIC-COVERED FURNITURE… I SAW SOME IN A FRIEND’S HOME IN COLLEGE AND HAVE NEVER GOTTEN OVER IT!

which historical design figure do you most identify with? JEAN-CHARLES MOREUX DID IT ALL. HE WAS AN ARCHITECT, HE DESIGNED INTERIORS, HE CREATED FURNITURE AND HE DID LANDSCAPE DESIGN. A TRUE RENAISSANCE MAN.

Proust on Design: Timothy Corrigan | CLOTH & KIND

which living designer do you most admire? NEW YORK DESIGN ICON VICENTE WOLF HAS BEEN A GREAT INSPIRATION.

what profession other than design would you like to attempt? I WOULD LOVE TO BE A LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT. WHAT A JOY IT MUST BE TO INTEGRATE SPACE, SHAPE AND FORM WITH THE MOST WONDERFUL OF ALL MATERIALS - TREES, SHRUBS, AND FLOWERS.

what is your greatest design extravagance? MY PORTRAIT COLLECTION. I HAVE ALWAYS LOVED PORTRAIT PAINTINGS BECAUSE THEY HAVE THEIR OWN KIND OF ICONOGRAPHY THAT TELLS YOU ABOUT THE TIME AND PLACE THAT THE PERSON IN THE PORTRAIT LIVED.

Proust on Design: Timothy Corrigan | CLOTH & KIND

when and where were you happiest with your design? MY PLACE IN THE FRENCH COUNTRYSIDE, THE CHATEAU DU GRAND-LUCÉ. I PURCHASED THE CHATEAU IN 2004 THEN UNDERTOOK ITS MASSIVE RESTORATION AND DECORATION, BRINGING IT BACK TO ITS FULL GLORY. IT DOESN’T MATTER WHAT I AM DOING THERE - PULLING WEEDS, FEEDING THE SWANS, OR WALKING IN THE WOODS - THIS IS THE PLACE WHERE I FIND THE TRUE MEANING OF JOY.

Proust on Design: Timothy Corrigan | CLOTH & KIND

what do you consider your greatest achievement in design? I HAVE SO LOVED THE DEVELOPMENT OF MY NEW LINE OF FABRICS AND FURNITURE FOR SCHUMACHER AS WELL AS CARPETS FOR PATTERSON, FLYNN & MARTIN THAT ARE ALL COMING OUT NEXT SPRING.

if you died and came back as another designer or design object, who or what do you think it would be? EMILIO TERRY WAS AN INCREDIBLE TASTEMAKER WHO NEVER REALLY RECEIVED GREAT FAME. I WOULD LIKE TO COME BACK AS HIM TO INSURE HE ACHIEVES THE LEVEL OF NOTORIETY HE DESERVES.

what specific design related talent are you lacking that you would you most like to have? GOOD HANDWRITING AND THE ABILITY TO SKETCH WELL… WHEN IT COMES TO A PEN OR PENCIL, I AM SEVERELY CHALLENGED!

what is your most treasured design related possession? A SMALL SILVER AND VERMEIL BOX WITH ENAMEL AND PORCELAIN THAT WAS GIVEN BY EMPRESS ELIZABETH ("SISI”) OF AUSTRIA TO HER NIECE, MY GREAT, GREAT GRANDMOTHER. IT’S FILLED WITH AN ODD COLLECTION OF SMALL MEMENTOS FROM MY FAMILY AND CHILDHOOD, LIKE THE FIRST STARFISH I EVER FOUND AND SOME OLD KEYS TO THE STABLES AT MY GRANDMOTHER’S HOUSE. IT HAS BEEN WITH ME THROUGH TODAY AND SERVES AS A KIND OF TOUCHSTONE.

Proust on Design: Timothy Corrigan | CLOTH & KIND

what do you regard as the lowest depths of misery in design? CLOSED MINDED PEOPLE WITH NO DESIRE TO GROW OR LEARN. IT’S SO IMPORTANT TO ALWAYS BE OPEN TO NEW IDEAS AND WAYS OF LOOKING AT THINGS… THAT’S WHEN MAGIC HAPPENS IN DESIGN, AS IN LIFE!

what curse word do you most frequently use? I AM EMBARRASSED TO SAY IT, BUT IT WOULD HAVE TO BE “WHAT THE FU-CK?...YOU’VE GOT TO BE KIDDING ME!”

what is your favorite design related word? ELEGANT

Proust on Design: Timothy Corrigan | CLOTH & KIND

what is your least favorite design related word? DELICIOUS OR FABULOUS… REALLY, WHAT SELF-RESPECTING PERSON WOULD UTTER SUCH SILLINESS?

what turns you on in design? HAVING NUMEROUS OPPORTUNITIES TO TRY NEW AND DIFFERENT THINGS. I ALSO LOVE THE CHALLENGE OF TAKING ARCHITECTURE FROM AN EARLIER TIME, IN WHICH PEOPLE LIVED VERY DIFFERENTLY AND THEN FIGURING OUT HOW TO APPROPRIATELY UPDATE THAT STRUCTURE FOR THE WAY WE LIVE AND WORK TODAY.

what turns you off in design? OH, WHERE DOES ONE BEGIN HERE? 1. I AM SO OVER IKAT THAT I COULD SCREAM. 2. I HATE ROOMS THAT LOOK LIKE THEY JUST CAME DELIVERED FROM A SHOW ROOM. 3. I DON’T UNDERSTAND MOST OF THE PLASTIC FURNITURE FROM THE 70’S… IT WAS CHEAP THEN AND HASN’T IMPROVED WITH AGE.

what is your motto in design? COMFORTABLE ELEGANCE. I TRY TO CREATE ENVIRONMENTS WHERE PEOPLE FEEL AT HOME AND WELCOME. COMFORT IS THE KEY INGREDIENT.

//

IMAGE CREDITS | Images courtesy of Timothy Corrigan, Architectural Digest, Vulgare & OperaGloves.

ABOUT PROUST ON DESIGN | Answered by our design icons, these must-ask questions come from a 19th century parlor game made popular by Marcel Proust, the French novelist, essayist & critic. Proust believed the direct questions and honest responses that they elicited revealed the true nature of the individual. For this column, we have put a design related spin on the traditional questions. While this method has been used by many journalists throughout the years, we were primarily inspired by The Proust Questionnaire, which appears monthly on the back page of one of our all time favorite magazines, Vanity Fair (also Krista’s alma mater). Read all of the previous Proust on Design questionnaires here.

Pauline Boyd

Limelight: Pauline Boyd of Counterpane | CLOTH & KIND

Hi. My name is… Pauline Boyd

My company is… Counterpane

I’m the… Maker

I make... Quilts of my own design, all one-of-a-kind, with bits of things I find traveling or old clothes, vintage, or found fabrics.

Limelight: Pauline Boyd of Counterpane | CLOTH & KIND

Something you need to know about me is… When I made my first quilt, around 2004, I had never even used a sewing machine. I had no fabric so I just went around the apartment cutting up stuff - literally the sheets, curtains, clothes. I still try to emulate that spirit nowadays.

Limelight: Pauline Boyd of Counterpane | CLOTH & KIND

Here’s how this company came to be… I had been struggling to work as an actress in New York for over ten years and the idea of letting that go started brewing in me. I took off to join my boyfriend in Asia where he was working, and I just took the time to sew and develop my quilting style. He bought me a foot-pedal table sewing machine and we dragged it home in a tuk tuk. When I got back to the states I started to sell pieces, to supportive family and friends, making them on the kitchen floor.  I made a logo, did my tax registration stuff, did a gallery show in LA, and slowly started to get some press and some stores and I’ve been chugging away since then. I started without any kind of business plan, so that’s a big focus right now - media packets, market research. look book, etc - stuff I was too afraid of before but now its clear I owe it to myself in order to really play ball!

My absolute favorite thing we sell right now is… Well, I get sentimental about certain quilts sometimes - since each little bit of fabric in them has a story to me. Right now my favorite thing is a quilt (below) that’s in the wonderful store, Beautiful Dreamers, in Brooklyn. Its made from these old silk shirts of my dad’s from Paris and some worn out tribal jackets and indigo from Vietnam and Laos - stuff I foraged for.  It's a real roots piece for me and embodies that essential quilt philosophy on the re-use of things to make other new beautiful things for ourselves. I’m half a mind to call them and get it back everyday, but its in the right place there!

Limelight: Pauline Boyd of Counterpane | CLOTH & KIND

Here’s a sneak peek of something we’re working on now… A lot is happening right now!  I did my first design job with a big company - a quilt and some pillows for the home department at Anthropologie - available early winter. I’ve been recently cold-calling some of my favorite clothing and textile designers and saying hey, I want to make a quilt from your scraps and I am thrilled to have a few collaborations in the pipeline. I’m always playing around with talented friends - doing some pieced accents on clothes, bags and furniture - seeing what is fun and interesting and marketable.

I’m most proud of… My decision to make this a job. With this work, I get to look at what is in front of me everyday, work with my hands and make something. Its a new dream. Its feels like a second chance at creative fulfillment.

Limelight: Pauline Boyd of Counterpane | CLOTH & KIND

I detest… Planning! I have a ridiculous sense of the timing for this work! I guess no one ever said making quilts was quick and easy but I forget the creative time is important too. I think I can finish something a given day and then a month later I’m still arranging the puzzle pieces, stitching, tweaking... I’m learning to factor in the creative process, not just the construction time.

I could never have done it without this person… I had/have major wonderful support from my family - both financially and emotionally. In terms of the nuts and bolts of actually making a company happen, that would be my man, Chris. His practicality and clarity of thought and vision have been imperative to this process, as I can often get lost in future, the past, or just lose track of what the next action at hand is. He also holds the bar really high from a design perspective and I can bounce ideas off of him or he will challenge me with questions about composition or color. Having to be responsible for my decisions helps me really get behind my own work - it helps me feel proud. I’m not ashamed to say he has been a real backbone to this company!

Limelight: Pauline Boyd of Counterpane | CLOTH & KIND

I consistently read these for inspiration… I love Pinterest of course, mouthwatering. Love Fibercopia and CLOTH & KIND for education.  I read some design/fashion blogs - Design Sponge, Design for Mankind, Remodelista, The Sartorialist - the usual suspects. I read them because they are so well curated but it's not really the world I exist in. I like Blondehaus, Weird Friends, Bleach Black - for a balance from the edgier side of the spectrum.  I’ve got piles of books full of quilt history which are fun to drool over. NYT crossword keeps me fresh - I’ll do that when I need to break my brain from a piece I’m working on. I also have some old school reference books which I need sometimes. Since I’m self taught, I have to learn little tricks wherever I can.

I would like to share the limelight with… Other quilters! There are a lot of young people making quilts - which is really inspiring and exciting to me. People like Meg Callahan, Ashley Thayer, Gina RockenWagner, Maura Grace Ambrose  - they are all doing interesting things with a really old practice.

Limelight: Pauline Boyd of Counterpane | CLOTH & KIND

India Hicks

Proust on Design: India Hicks | CLOTH & KIND

what is your idea of perfect design happiness? IS THERE SUCH A THING? A PERFECTLY POOFED PINK SOFA FREE OF DOG HAIR AND OREO COOKIE STAINS WOULD DO ME JUST FINE.

what is your greatest fear in design? THAT I WAKE UP ONE MORNING AND FIND THE ANISH KAPOOROLYMPIC TOWER IN MY GARDEN. ANISH IS A CLOSE FRIEND AND BRILLIANT ARTIST BUT GOOD GOD THAT THING IS HIDEOUS.

which historical design figure do you most identify with? WELL HAVING DAVID HICKS AS YOUR FATHER CERTAINLY MEANS HE IS IN MY DNA. QUITE LITERALLY.

which living designer do you most admire? KELLY WEARSTLER. NOT BECAUSE I WOULD NECESSARILY WANT TO LIVE IN ONE OF HER INTERIORS BUT BECAUSE SHE HAS GUTS, DRIVE, DETERMINATION AND ABOVE ALL HER OWN POINT OF VIEW. SHE IS A BEAUTIFUL HARD WORKING WOMAN WHO HAS MADE IT ON HER OWN AND IS A MOTHER ON TOP OF ALL THAT.

Proust on Design: India Hicks | CLOTH & KIND

what profession other than design would you like to attempt? I WOULD LIKE TO EDIT A MAGAZINE. I LIKE LONG HOURS, I LIKE A CHALLENGE, I LIKE DEADLINES BUT MOST OF ALL I LIKE BEAUTIFULLY LAID OUT PAGES OF GOOD DESIGN COUPLED WITH INTERESTING FACT.

what is your greatest design extravagance? I DON’T HUGELY OVER SPEND WHEN IT COMES TO DESIGN OR INTERIORS, PROBABLY LESS SO THAN MOST, BUT WE DO HAVE HUNDREDS OF COFFEE TABLE BOOKS. A GREAT INDULGENCE BECAUSE YOU REALLY NEVER READ THE COPY YOU ONLY FLEETINGLY GLIMPSE AT A WORD OR TWO.

when and where were you happiest with your design? RIGHT NOW. RIGHT THIS MINUTE IN MY PALE PINK OFFICE ON A BAHAMAIN SPRING DAY KNOWING THAT MY COLLECTION FOR HSN EXCEEDED ALL OUR EXPECTATIONS AND SALES GOALS. AM I ALLOWED TO BOAST ABOUT THAT?

Proust on Design: India Hicks | CLOTH & KIND

what do you consider your greatest achievement in design? MY WEBSITE! IT’S A HUGE PROJECT AND ENORMOUS COMMITMENT. BLOOD, SWEAT AND TEARS GO INTO IT. FEW PEOPLE UNDERSTAND WHAT IT TAKES FROM A PERSONAL AND FINANCIAL COMMITMENT TO KEEP AN ECOMMERCE SITE MOVING FORWARD.

if you died and came back as another designer or design object, who or what do you think it would be? A SMYTHSON LEATHER BOUND PHOTO ALBUM IN THE HICKS FLINT WOOD HOUSEHOLD. MY CHILDREN LOVE THEIR SCRAP BOOKS FILLED WITH PHOTOS, NOTES, LETTERS, AND MEMORABILIA. LOVING CHERISHED AND LOOKED AFTER.

Proust on Design: India Hicks | CLOTH & KIND

what specific design related talent are you lacking that you would you most like to have? THE ACCOUNTING SIDE OF A DESIGN PROJECT!

what is your most treasured design related possession? MY IPHONE CAMERA. I RECORD EVERYTHING – TEXTURES, COLOURS, MOODS.

what do you regard as the lowest depths of misery in design? A HORRIBLE CLIENT.

what curse word do you most frequently use? I HAVE SEVERAL. THEY ARE ALL VERY EFFECTIVE.

Proust on Design: India Hicks | CLOTH & KIND

what is your favorite design related word? PERFECT.

what is your least favorite design related word? ICON.

what turns you on in design? FORM AND FUNCTION.

what turns you off in design? ANYTHING OVER-PRICED. A CHAIR, A CARPENTER, A CAN OF PAINT.

 what is your motto in design? “GOOD TASTE AND DESIGN ARE BY NO MEANS DEPENDENT UPON MONEY.” MY FATHER WROTE THIS INTO MY LITTLE AUTOGRAPH BOOK WHEN I WAS SEVEN. I DID NOT HAVE A CLUE WHAT IT MEANT.

Proust on Design: India Hicks | CLOTH & KIND

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IMAGE CREDITS | Images courtesy of India Hicks, her Facebook page & Instagram. Kelly Wearstler image via Instagram.

ABOUT PROUST ON DESIGN | Answered by our design icons, these must-ask questions come from a 19th century parlor game made popular by Marcel Proust, the French novelist, essayist & critic. Proust believed the direct questions and honest responses that they elicited revealed the true nature of the individual. For this column, we have put a design related spin on the traditional questions. While this method has been used by many journalists throughout the years, we were primarily inspired by The Proust Questionnaire, which appears monthly on the back page of one of our all time favorite magazines, Vanity Fair (also Krista’s alma mater). Read all of the previous Proust on Design questionnaires here.

Sally King Benedict

Guest Edited by Tami Ramsay Artist Sally King Benedict creates works that are a beautiful confluence of drawing and painting and that speak graphically in a visual language of color washes, abstract forms and intersecting lines. When creating, she does so unselfconsciously, with obvious freedom and spontaneity, and with a palpable openness, even when being observed. There is a purity to her work that is deeply rich and playful.There is no serious staring at the canvas or paper, no long contemplative moments before maker and medium meet. She glides effortlessly between several different works in progress, instinctive in her movements, dripping paint on this one, crushing charcoal on another, enjoying the fresh air on the back patio of her Atlanta studio where the light is dappled and the surrounding garden is lush and dreamy. She works with multiple brushes in hand at once, her cache of Japanese calligraphy brushes equally at home beside her hardware store bristle brushes that have been trashed by repeated scrubbings across her canvases. Like waves lapping the shore, she is easy come and go with her process, in a comfortable creative rhythm. If there is tension there, it is hidden behind her inherent effervescence of spirit, a quick and contagious Cheshire cat-like smile and fairy laugh.

Curated: Sally King Benedict | Guest Edited by Tami Ramsay | CLOTH & KIND

MOSS, 40 x 40, 2013 | Hidell Brooks Gallery

Benedict’s creative roots run deep, back to her childhood in Atlanta, GA, where she cut her milk teeth in a home that firmly encouraged all manner of creative ilke. “I have been painting and drawing and making sculpture ever since I can remember,” she said. “It always came naturally to me.” It didn't hurt that she was literally submerged in world of modern art by her parents, whose collection included works by Todd Murphy and Dennis Paul Williams. “My mom worked for her good friend Doug Macon who owned a contemporary art gallery in Atlanta in the 90s,” she said, “and Doug was always encouraging me to be creative.” It was this type of upbringing, one that relished whimsy and creative wit, that encouraged Benedict’s color outside the lines approach to self-expression and helped map the course to her current vocation.

Curated: Sally King Benedict | Guest Edited by Tami Ramsay | CLOTH & KIND

She went on to study studio art and painting at the College of Charleston in South Carolina under Cliff Peacock as well as printmaking under Barbara Duval. “This duo shaped my practice as an artist for sure,” Benedict said. “I learned something important from every bit of criticism they handed me.” After college, Benedict stayed in Charleston for several years, met and married her husband George, and enjoyed storied success as an artist, her paintings snatched up by collectors and gracing the pages of national and regional magazines. A phenomenal selection of her works are currently for sale at Hidell Brooks Gallery in Charlotte, NC, but if you can't make it there, good things come to those who shop online. Her website has an enviable bevy of new works up for grabs in her studio. Benedict has also recently collaborated with Serena & Lily and you can expect to see her original works on paper and canvas as well as signed limited edition fine art prints of her work through their Art Collection, which will be available in May. Stay posted and we'll let you know as soon as they are available so you can make haste and break out your plastic. In the meantime, enjoy an exclusive sneak peek of three works that will be offered by Serena & Lily in their Art Collection.

Curated: Sally King Benedict | Guest Edited by Tami Ramsay | CLOTH & KIND... Available in Serena & Lily's Art Collection starting in May 2013!
Curated: Sally King Benedict | Guest Edited by Tami Ramsay | CLOTH & KIND... Available in Serena & Lily's Art Collection starting in May 2013!
Curated: Sally King Benedict | Guest Edited by Tami Ramsay | CLOTH & KIND... Available in Serena & Lily's Art Collection starting in May 2013!

TOP | Brown Edge Paper, 10 x 13, paper, 2013 MIDDLE | Aquatint, limited edition print, 2013 BOTTOM | Abstract Gold, 20 x 24, canvas, 2013 All three, and others, will be available exclusively through Serena & Lily's Art Collection starting in May 2013

Admittedly, Benedict has been largely influenced by Abstract Expressionists like the great Helen Frankenthaler, a pioneer in Color Field painting, and Richard Diebenkorn, arguably one of the most influential and prolific American modern artists of the 20th century, as well as Pablo Picasso, Joan Mitchell and David Hockney. As such, she dallies part in figurative and geometric abstraction but there is something uniquely fresh and singular about her eye, her particular spin on abstract imagery. Her color sense is recognizably Benedict, her use of flax Belgian linen panels washed in her favorite hues of black, blue and white are a trademark and highly collectable. The subjects in her face paintings are partly abstraction and cubism, but again, in signature Benedict style, often appear well fed, cherubic, and echo Ziggy Stardust with geometric cheeks, blocky neon eyebrows and noses out of joint.

Curated: Sally King Benedict | Guest Edited by Tami Ramsay | CLOTH & KIND

GREEN BROW, 12 x 16, 2010 | guache and oil pastel on linen board

Curated: Sally King Benedict | Guest Edited by Tami Ramsay | CLOTH & KIND

SWEET CHEEKS, 24 x 24, 2013 | acrylic, gouache, ink, charcoal and oil pastel on linen 

Her sumi ink paintings are an altogether different subject. Historically, Japanese sumi ink painting verges on the mystical and is believed to capture the unseen with an indelible inked brush stroke, one that cannot be changed or altered—you know, like deep metaphors for life. Let’s just say Benedict’s sumi ink works are rooted in more of a I've got noidea how this is going to end up kind ofmysticism. She starts by moistening the Arches Rives BFKpaper with water, loads her Japanese calligraphy brush with sumi ink and then, in a series of instinctive, broad strokes, water and ink react resulting in a crazy radial ripple effect, a squid ink like plume of subtle shading and tonal variation, that morphs and changes continually until the paper dries. Then for good measure Benedict grabs some charcoal and random pastels, crushes them into small bits and throws all that on the moistened paper. It’s this kind of approach to art that really excites Benedict. “I love seeing how different liquids and pigments take to different surfaces,” she said. ”It's a constant science project in my studio!”

Curated: Sally King Benedict | Guest Edited by Tami Ramsay | CLOTH & KIND

And speaking of fairies again, Benedict has an endearing lightness of being, much like Peter Pan, who knew that the real trick to happiness was to keep the best of the child you were at heart, without forgetting when you grow up.  Is it her lightness of constitution, her ebullience, that drives her creative vision and makes her art so desirable and lust worthy?  At the very least, it certainly lends itself to her emphatic embrace of motherhood to her nine month old son River. Benedict has most definitely grown up but it has only sweetened the deal for her artistically. “My entire being is better with a baby,” she said. “I no longer take time in the studio for granted. I feel like he has turned a light on within in me that I never knew I had.” That said, her days are delightfully filled with lots of painting, laughing and playing with her family. Her perfect day?  “Sunny, 75 degrees....road tripping with my husband and baby boy.....final destination: Duryea's Lobster Deck, Montauk.” My guess is that wherever she is, Benedict is always at play in the color field of her making, picking flowers and making daisy chains with a mischievous grin on her face.

Curated: Sally King Benedict | Guest Edited by Tami Ramsay | CLOTH & KIND

IMAGE CREDITS | Artwork images provided courtesy of Sally King Benedict. All other photography by Tami Ramsay, shot on location at the studio of Sally King Benedict in Atlanta, GA.

Zak Profera

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what is your idea of perfect design happiness?BEING SURROUNDED BY THE THINGS I LOVE.

what is your greatest fear in design? NOTHING - EVERYTHING CAN ALWAYS BE CHANGED OR FIXED.

which historical design figure do you most identify with? MAYBE A CAVEMAN - I KIND OF LOVE THE WHEEL.

which living designer do you most admire? I'M TOO MUCH OF A LIBRA TO COMMIT TO JUST ONE. EVERY GREAT DESIGNER BRINGS SOMETHING UNIQUE TO THE WORLD.

what is your greatest design extravagance? MY DESIGN BASED ON THE EXQUISITE 17TH CENTURY MATAHARI CLOTH OWNED BY KARUN THAKAR. IT'S QUITE MINIMAL AND COURAGEOUS WHILE STILL BEING TOTALLY USABLE.

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when and where were you happiest with your design? WHEN I SAW A STRIKE-OFF OF MY TAKIGAWA DESIGN FOR THE FIRST TIME, I KNEW I WAS ON THE RIGHT TRACK.

what do you consider your greatest achievement in design? LAUNCHING MY OWN BUSINESS - IT'S FAR MORE WORK THAN I'D EVER IMAGINED (AND TOTALLY WORTH IT).

if you died and came back as another designer/design related object, who/what do you think it would be? A NOGUCHI LIGHT SCULPTURE.

what specific design related talent are you lacking that you would most like to have? I WISH I WERE BRAVE ENOUGH TO HANDLE ELECTRICAL WIRING.

what is your most treasured design related possession? I HAVE A GOLD-PAINTED CONCRETE STATUE HEAD THAT I FOUND, FACE-DOWN ON THE STREET IN FRONT OF AN OLD SEMINARY DURING ONE OF THE WORST STORMS THAT HAD EVER HIT MANHATTAN. IT'S NOT THAT LARGE, BUT IT HAS TO WEIGH OVER 100 LBS.... SO NATURALLY, I HAD TO HAVE IT. IT LIVES PEACEFULLY ON MY TERRACE NOW.

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what do you regard as the lowest depths of misery in design? FASHION IN LIEU OF COMFORT...EXCEPT SOMETIMES. THERE ARE ALWAYS EXCEPTIONS.

what is your design motto? EVERYTHING IN YOUR HOME SHOULD HAVE A STORY BEHIND IT - OR YOU SHOULD JUST FIND IT TO BE EXTREMELY BEAUTIFUL (SEE PREVIOUS ANSWER RE: EXCEPTIONS).

what is your favorite design related word? MOMENT.

what is your least favorite design related word? MOMENT.

what turns you on in design? WHEN THINGS ARE DESIGNED AND COLLECTED WITH THE HEART, NOT WITH THE INTENTION TO IMPRESS.

what turns you off in design? EGOS.

what is your favorite curse word? I'VE BEEN KNOWN TO FREELY FLING F-BOMBS.

what profession other than design would you like to attempt? SECRET AGENT. TRAVEL, ADVENTURE, AND A BIT OF MYSTERY. WHAT'S NOT TO LIKE?

ZAK+FOX

PROUST ON DESIGN | Answered by my design icons, these must-ask questions come from a 19th century parlor game made popular by Marcel Proust, the French novelist, essayist & critic. This interview technique has been used by many journalists throughout the years but my column was primarily inspired by The Proust Questionnaire, which appears monthly on the back page of Vanity Fair(my alma mater). The twist here on CLOTH & KIND is that I've repurposed each question to relate to interior design. To read all of my Proust on Design interviews, please click here. Enjoy!